MacBook Pro Battery Packs

A note about batteries for the MacBook Pros. It is possible that on older MacBooks and MacBook Pros that the battery pack is on its last legs. I use coconutBattery to occasionally monitor the status of my battery pack. coconutBattery is a free program that tells what the current charge, maximum charge, current capacity, design capacity, battery loadcycles, battery temperature, age of you Mac, and battery power usage.

When I am writing this, my current battery specs are as follows:

Current charge: 4303 mAh
Maximum charge: 4464 mMh
96%

Battery capacity: 4464 mAh
Design capacity: 5450 mAH
81%

Mac model: MacBookPro5,5
Age of your Mac: 36 Months
Battery loadcycles: 344
Battery temperature: 30.8 C
Battery power usage: 13.2 Watt

So, when do you call a battery bad? How many battery load cycles are left on my battery pack?

Update: August 30, 2013

I purchased my new battery from Amazon and have installed it. So far so good.

MacBook Battery Chart

Consult the table below to see the maximum cycle count for your computer’s battery before it is considered consumed:

MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2010)MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) 1000
MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, Late 2008) 500
MacBook (Mid 2009)MacBook (Early 2009)

MacBook (Late 2008)

MacBook (Early 2008)

MacBook (Late 2007)

MacBook (Mid 2007)

MacBook (Late 2006)

MacBook (13-inch)

300
MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012)MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2011)

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2011)

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010)

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009)

MacBook Pro (Retina, Mid 2012)

MacBook pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011)

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2010)

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.53 GHz, Mid 2009)

MacBook Pro (15-inch Mid 2009)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2011)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2011)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2010)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2009)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2009)

1000
MacBook Pro (15-inch Late 2008) 500
MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2008)MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.4/2.2GHz)

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Core 2 Duo)

MacBook Pro (15-inch Glossy)

MacBook Pro (15-inch)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2008)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2008)

MacBook Pro (17-inch, 2.4GHz)

MacBook Pro (17-inch Core 2 Duo)

MacBook Pro (17-inch)

300
MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2012)MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2011)

MacBook Air (11-inch, Late 2010)

MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2012)

MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2011)

MacBook Air (13-inch, Late 2010)

1000
MacBook Air (Mid 2009) 500
MacBook Air (Late 2008)MacBook Air 300
All PowerBook G4 12″ 15″ and 17″ computers 300
All iBook G4 12″ and 14″ computers 300

Obviously if you want to have a fresh battery to extend your usage regardless of how many battery cycles are left then go for it.

Trouble in Threes

Garage DoorThe weekend started off with a boom. Heard the garage door start to open then with a loud crash heard it fall with a loud boom. Sectional two car wood garage door dropped about three feet after one of the main coiled springs busted. This caused the garage door opener slide gear to strip out also. So, we decided to keep our cars in the garage over the weekend, until we got it fixed on Monday. However, the extent of repairs included 10 new nylon roller guide roller bearings to replace the falling apart steel (very noisy) ball bearings, two new cables to replace the frayed stainless steel cables (which were ready to break themselves) which are attached to each side bottom section and wraps around the top pulley assemblies, replacement of two new coil springs for lifting and balancing the door, and one new carriage slide for the garage door opener assembly. Well, now all is quiet on the western front (front of the house faces west).

So, Tuesday rolls around. The wife calls me, “Jim the dryer stopped working!” Oh boy, just what I wanted to hear on a Tuesday morning. The symptom was that the dryer stopped turning. So, I decide to pull it apart, (what a pain)!

However, I found a Repair Clinic website that provides videos on how to disassemble all types of dryers (both electric and natural gas) that was quite helpful. But, it still did not help me figure out what the problem was. Our dryer is a natural gas dryer. All switches checked out okay, drum belt was also okay, and yes, I had AC power to the dryer. In my mind, it was either the timer or the drive motor itself. However, it could have been something else that I might have overlooked. No matter now, since the dryer was a number of years old, we decided to get another one for delivery tomorrow on Wednesday. I put everything back together (somewhat). The drum is now filled with spare parts. 🙂

Now, Tuesday evening rolls along, and I sit in my favorite swivel rocking chair, and I hear a loud spring pop. Oh boy, now the spring swivel assembly needs to be replaced. What a pain in the rear.

Big Redwood TreeOne thing that is certain in life is that everything wears out. Hopefully that is all for now, since everything seems to happen in threes. However, I am not sure when the first of three happened. Was it the redwood trees (my how fast redwoods grow from 6 feet to 70 ft tall with 3 foot diameter trunks) with roots that cracked the pool plumbing lines? Was it the cost of cutting these redwoods down, not to mention the cost of fixing the pool? Was it the wind storm that blew the fence down? Was it the broken windshield from a rock coming off that dump truck? Was it when I tripped up the step, and skinned my shin? Oh boy, it’s a good thing I lost count. 🙂